Camchat suisse


11-Aug-2015 20:36

Here are some of the notes I took while reading the book: When you run an Xcode project from a standard (i.e., non-admin) user, you might be asked to enter credentials of a user in the “Developer Tools group.” You can fix this by adding the (current) user to the group: When you purchase something from the Mac App Store, you’ll see a little icon in your dock, but that doesn’t show you the percentage of progress.

Even when we’re not here, the room is drawing a lot of power.

What devices are turned on at any given time depends largely on which of us is here, and what we’re doing.

If you try something similar with the computer (try leaving the semi-colon off in C or miss an indent in Python, for example), you’ll get a nasty error message.

Disclaimer: I received this book for free through the O’Reilly Blogger program. is a very short “book” on RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), a way to tag and identify objects over varying ranges, and how to use Arduino to create a few interesting RFID projects.

The book assumes that you have some experience with Arduino and micro-controllers (i.e., do you know what a breadboard, jumper wires, and circuits are? We start with a very brief introduction to RFID, follow up with two introductory technical tutorials on Arduino, and end with a fairly simple home automation project: Between my officemate and me, we have dozens of devices drawing power in our office: two laptops, two monitors, four or five lamps, a few hard drives, a soldering iron, Ethernet hubs, speakers, and so forth.