Dating a parker fly classic


31-Mar-2015 13:10

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The button—with its self-contained roundness and infinite variability—has a quiet perfection to it.Running a cascade of buttons through your fingers feels satisfyingly heavy, like coins or candy; their clicking whoosh and blur of colors lull you.But, on both men’s clothes and women’s, buttons helped accentuate lovely lines, of the arm, say, or the bosom.Buttons came in all shapes and sizes, but most often they were mounted on a shank; you ran thread through the shank’s hole to attach the button to fabric.This design was lost with them until it re-emerged in mid-19, “clothes began to be made so close-fitting that they followed the lines of the body from shoulders to hips like a glove.” Buttons helped that snug fit along.This didn’t mean clothes were cut more sparingly; wealthy people still liked the costly display of excess fabric.

The episode singles these sounds out for analysis and deconstructs their origin, a classic approach that works beautifully.You may find yourself looking toward your phone several times during the episode’s five-minute run, thinking you’ve received a text—a weird overlap of podcast and life that makes the episode’s point perfectly.A button packs an extraordinary amount of information about a given time and place—its provenance—onto a crowded little canvas.Children learn to button and unbutton early in life, and they keep doing it until they’re dead. ) But in this episode, Roman Mars’ beloved short-form design podcast asks how sound designers make “organic sounds for inorganic things.” The clicks, sproings, and clatters that sound engineer Jim Mc Kee demonstrates for Mars are the background noise of everyday life for people who use digital devices.

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"was originally used more as an ornament than as a fastening, the earliest known being found at Mohenjo-daro in the Indus Valley [now Pakistan].It is made of a curved shell and about 5000 years old." Early buttons like these usually consisted of a decorative flat face that fit into a loop. Supporting yards of cloth at a single point required buttons of architectural heft, made of bone, horn, bronze or wood.