Shroud of turin fake carbon dating


20-Jun-2015 09:04

In 1532, there was a fire in the church in Chambery, France, where the Shroud was being kept.Part of the metal storage case melted and fell on the cloth, leaving burns, and efforts to extinguish the fire left water stains. In 1534, nuns sewed patches over the fire-damaged areas and attached a full-size support cloth to the back of the Shroud. The Shroud was moved to Turin in 1578, where it remains to this day.Ray Rogers, retired Fellow with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and lead chemist with the original science team STURP (the 1978 Shroud of Turin Research Project, involving approximately 35 scientists directly examining the Shroud for five days), has shown conclusively that the sample cut from The Shroud of Turin in 1988 was taken from an area of the cloth that was re-woven during the middle ages.Here are some excerpts: "Pyrolysis-mass-spectrometry results from the sample area coupled with microscopic and microchemical observations prove that the radiocarbon sample was not part of the original cloth of the Shroud of Turin.In 2002, a team of experts did restoration work, such as removing the patches from 1534 and replacing the backing cloth.One of the specialists was Swiss textile historian Mechthild Flury-Lemberg.The radiocarbon date was thus not valid for determining the true age of the shroud." "As part of the Shroud of Turin research project (STURP), I took 32 adhesive-tape samples from all areas of the shroud and associated textiles in 1978." "It enabled direct chemical testing on recovered linen fibers and particulates".These dimensions correlate with ancient measurements of 2 cubits x 8 cubits - consistent with loom technology of the period.

She was surprised to find a peculiar stitching pattern in the seam of one long side of the Shroud, where a three-inch wide strip of the same original fabric was sewn onto a larger segment.The stitching pattern, which she says was the work of a professional, is quite similar to the hem of a cloth found in the tombs of the Jewish fortress of Masada. This kind of stitch has never been found in Medieval Europe.