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I have the honor to be with the most profound Respect. 40.] ,, , , New York August IS'" 1768 My Lord, ° I have the satisfaction to inform your Lordship that the Obstructions complain'd of by Commissioners of His Majesty's Customs in the execution of their Duty have never been occasioned by any thing which has happen'd in this IVovince, nor has there been llie least subject of complaint from the behaviour of any persons here, on account of the late Duties impos'd : This tranquillity however is now render'd very precarious by a late order from the Commissioners to M' Elliot' our Collector forbidding him to receive any thing for the Duties but Silver, which is not at present to be procured in the Province, so that n strict compliance with that Order will certainly occasion very great uneasiness here, & lay the foundation for future disorders. J r u ^^ ^'°"' "'" Majesty's to recommend to your attention not doubtmg but through your assistance, and with your advice^he Colonies will be indred^^^^^ adopt such regulations for the Commercial parts as will improve the Trade, ndfix th Aff ion of the Savages, and ,n the end produce all those advantages which you eem to hint w„ , M have been denved from the Execution of the plan suggested by the B^rd of Trade l^n T: I am &" Hillsborough .^i.,.:j:::z ,: .';;;:ru;f,:::::n:.,r,;,':: ' Supra, p. to the Earl of Shelburne dated 22- of February 1767 & i mv letter to the Lords of Trade dated 4- April 1707. I must desire that you will always be ready to attend either of them, when ca Ued upon bj which means business will I hope, always be attended & properly caried on fo our mulu.l Interest, and this I earnestly recommend to yru all \ [ Bdt Brethren I must also advise you to be unanimous amongst yourselves & reside in your respect! th^P ac Ti'c'f ""' "' "'""""'"^ °^ ""'"'« ^'"°"«^' °^^- ^''^--' - has'been too nlh the 1 ractice for some years past, to the great weakening of your confederacy. issue to th.' Ccngress, i.n.i endeavouring all in his power f i avoid their making any requisition of aid from the Knglisli should it so happen that a War must take place. proceeded to the IJo«er, where the seven Nations of Canada, after premising the occasion of their meeting then, and that they could not with propriety unite in measures until they had oh.-yed the institutions of their An.extors, by |MTf»rmiiig in the fullest manner the .-eremony of Condolence (or those losses, and giving tho aucesuary Bul U ettc, lo the Six Nutiotw on thai occasion. About noon four Canoes with 26 Mississages from the North side of Lake Ontario came to Camp to attend the Congress. ie party who continue to declare openly against the Authority of the Parliament of great Brittain. I thought of nothing but to retire, and spend my lew remaining days with sutislaction ; ihuiering mysell' t Siiit n Caitliful diseharge of my di-ly, in the Adr.iiniatration of C.overn', in times the most dillk-ulf, had given me some claim lo His Maj"' favour. I trust it will not be much to suppose the house of Commons particularly attended to my case, when they addressed His Maj-' to recompence the o Hicers of the Crown in Ame ica, who had suilered on tha-. People in general throughout the Colonies, expected I should have been d.stinguishe.l by some mark of His Maj'^' favour as I had heen so remarkably distinguished fy their resentment— i'rovidence, by the death of Sir Henry Moore, placed me in a situation of receiving a compensation, had I been suilered to remain in the Administration, and to enjoy the usual prolits — shall I, My Lord, be distinguished by a demand of part of those profits which have been allowed to every other Commander in Chief? Akonwarage, when they arrived at Fort Pit, were informed that there were some of the Principal Indians of that Shawanese town, and nation then there, in consequence of which they went to those Shawanese, and asked whether they cou'd take upon them to hear, & receive the messages they had for their Nation from the Six Natif ns. '''"f "^ ^"""^^^ ''^^'"' ^« ^^ '-^ they had been promised) w Ttl d So the ' r "/'" '"' '''"' '^'"""° "''"P^^^ a, Carolina ami (Jeorgia, which His Majesty conceives to be the only proper and constitutional Mode & the King has the better hope of their compliance with t li recommendation, as His Majesty finds it to have been the Metho.l formerly practised in the t.o lony of New York itself, an.l is certainly the only one by which any person can he properly authorized to represent the Province and to act for it in all matters which concern its interest in general. ^Kk At a Congress with the several Nations on Tuesday SS" Oct' Pkesent— as before. ieo..,„|..t,j,..l tlu,i»l,.r, ..f lli- Ull..r )-..«r. nn.l ..rv*,l in .1 iinul il» fr.lii, lim, in I7«a, l„. The Six Nations after sometime spent in Council, returned to the public Council place. On the .luly, of the following year, he departed from 0^,2 w, 1 the ar„,y o Mo,, real, of city h.. At the dcpaftnr of Get eral Amherat for England ,n 1703, Major-General Gage him a, eonunandcr-in-chicf of his Majesty' for in Nor h Amenca. It gave me particular satisfaction to find this party entirely defeated last week, in a violent strugle to turn out such of the Elective Magistrates of this City, as had distinguished themselves any way in favour of Govern' I believe your Lord'' will be pleased to know that the Members of His Maj"'* Council, with a sing o exception, and the Representatives of this City in General Assembly have zealously exerted themselves for a dissolution of the nonimportation agreement in New York ; which must have a General good effect in all the North American Colonies. Every thing in my power was done to give him a reception suited '" his Rank and the dignity of the Commission he Vol. iiirivnl" which he accordingly dentanded by his Secretary. In this case the Lieut' Gov', acting under the same Commissioi;, must divide the profits with the Gov' in Chief. — however ten days elapsed before they met, & the meeting being opened, the Shawanese expressed great satisfaction in seeing messengers from the Six Nations, telling them that Darkness had a long time reigned between them, and the Six Nations, and they were happy to see at last light appear from that Quarter, and at the came time were glad of the opportunity of having some of the Twightwees with them to hear what they had to impart from their Confederacy. My Lord Your Lordships most obedient and most devoted The Right Honourable Humble Servant The Earl of Hillsborough. Johnson Governor Moore to tlie Earl of Ilil Uhorovgh. The scarcity not only of silver Imt of every other Currency, even paper, has been lo grent for some few years past, that M' Klliot has been under the necessity of giving every indulgence he could consistent with his office in collecting the Diitiet; The Commissioners of the Cuslonn in England h been inform'd, that ho has often been forced to take an Obligation fom the ' Ax PRiw Eixinr, unri* of thx l«t i:«rl of Minto. Your Lordship will see by those different c wha the d.are which we labour under at present, for no par Ucular Bound a.y Lme [was] drawn between the Provinces, the English claim supported by that which was made before them by the Dutch extended as far as the forty fifth degree of Latitude, This LTne was supposed by the French to be more to the Southward than we found it on ob erva Lt & T /ni f T '" '^''' P*""*' "'■^ '"^"'^ •^y "^"«« «'"-« "^- to be uneasy from the certain discoverrnld m H ''f^''''' P"''^ ' '-^ y«t more cause the private Belts & Messag s p s If^om h f "\ " ."""'' ''^ """y "'' '^'^ '"•''-«' "f Councils & of the false Reports & Mi! T ' " ""'"' '"'"^^ P^'-^"''' "'""^eir several and former letters wi sh ^ Ltia ointm ^ h"! Brethren 8 A Belt I give you a Pouch with a String of Wampum in it, which you are to make use of wh^n v , to'To.: T l"V' ""' °' ": '°"'^"^^"^^'' ^"'^ ''- "P «" «-•' occasions wtoudajror T to condole for the same, and remove the concern thereby occasioned Brethren ^ Strings of Wampum I now supply you with a torch or candle which you are to travel with hv ni„i.f . Sir William hr.,judged it highly necessary, as well from the temper of the Indians, the greatness of their numbers, and the disorders they are too liable to commit when in Liquor, adv-ised the Magistrates to give notice to the Trader- ettc by no means to sell them any, untill the Congress was ended; and it was done previous to im arrival ; but having this day received U.that some Traders ettc had actually sold them a Keg of Rum, and that others had resolved to follow this example, which greatly alarmed the Inhabitants, and occasioned their applications to him to checi; it, he issued a notification under his hand and seal which he sent throughout the whole settlement by a peace Officer, strictly forbidding them at their peril to sell any Rum to the Indians, or any spirituous liquors whatsoever during the Congress, until they had removed, when they might sell it to them beyond the settlements; the apprehensions of the Inhabitants being very great, as from the temper shewn by many of the Warriors, tin y had reason to dread, thai neither their property, or persons would be "secure, should they get liquor amongst them. He w„, prolnoted in May 77.^ c T.7a 1 ''T'- "'T"'; *"'':" '""■■■" '"''"^'"^ •'— ^'"'-' "f "- 2'^.1 R-.'of foot. In my preceeding letter, I informed your Lord P of tlie steps that had been taken to introduce a general importation of goods from Great Brittain, and of the opposition which had been made to it, by that party who have in every other instance endeavoured to embrace the measures of Govern'. My Lord, The Earl of Dunmore arrived here on the IS"" of last month. It eoul.l not then My I-ord i)ut give me a very sensible uneasiness, when the Karl o( Disr-more eo'nniunicated to tne, Ine paragraph of 1 letter from your F^oni P 'n bim, dated the IC)'" of h-st, signifying Mis Majesty's pleasure "(hat a moiety of tlw perquisites and Kmoluments of the CJovern' of New York "should he aceounted for and paid to His I.ord"' from 'date of his t.;ommission to the time "of hir. The Instruct" to the V.o V of this Province relating to the salary and perquisites of (Jovern', has been understood in no other light here, than to intitle a Co V in Chief to half the emoluments in case of his absence ufter having taken upon himself the administration. The Shawanese replied that the head men of Agonwarage were then assembled there with some Twightwee Chiefs, and they thought it convenient, and proper they shou M deliver their message there, and agreed to hear them the next day.Letter of Sir William Johnson to the Earl of Hillsborough „o November 6. by the Indians, deter.nining the boundary line' between them and the English, Map of the frontier of the Northern Colonies, with the bou'ndar'y line" Mtabliihed bet'w'een them "and the Indians, at the treaty held at Fort Stanwix, November, 1708 ... Report of the Lords of Trade to the Committee of Privy Council, on New" York "aeis '.'."". Letter of the Eail of Hil Uborough to Governor Moore-Canada boundary Ac . Letter of Governor Moore to the Earl of llillsborougli-military poeu on the northern frontie"rll communications, ilc December 23. We consider them as the cement of our union, and as you have cleansed us with water, we do in like manner take of the ccarest running stream & wash your inside thoroughly therewith cleansing you from all impurities ^ /j. V .i-umey thro' the -i-u-an wiih.hes,r N H "a • :: M:;:;:r ;:: ""; ''''"'"''"' "•"'=•'' pla.e a.reable to their .iesire. " 7'^ ' """"'"^"i '''''' "^ -- ■"•'•'■ssarv lor His Maj H'- inform , I ion \. wi,h -h'n J V^t 1 r::''''';"''';' ,'"■"■" .'"" '" ^^'^'""^ '■»••• «•-"'' "-"• --las Knemys to I ,1 . " '^"""'••'•" ^^ ^^estern Nations who h„d i:::rr; L;:;:;;:;:;:;:::;;d T;:.;;;;:;:.:':'r -••■.v-'^;":.;;'^:^;":,:::: their Depu.y 1. r"' T' '" "^'"^ ''^ ^'"' «-'»^i«f«'=''o" t'^e commendable disposition of the of a F.? to have given your assent to another Bill for the same purpo e w U out a clause suspending ,t's execution, until His Maj.- pleasure could be known'T. a loss to guess, at the reasons which induced the Members of the Tonn HI tnl • ^ step so contrary to your duty and to your Instrucf '° "^"'' y°" *° "" Your co,,duct on this occasion h.s incurred His Majesty's displeasure which I am commanded to s,gn,fy to you; and to observe to you that altho' the i Jnrco-i^ 1^^^^^^ the Colo,.y in tranquility as a very desirable and commendable obj c Vj't H s M -^ zz:^'z:^::^fr r^'^'-^ ^^^^-^^ on. It .8 necessary I should ac.you, that the Bill transmitted by Sir Henry Moore h-,d to Lords o rade .nclos,ng the Act assented to by you. o the Lounc.1 had as you will see by the inclosed order, advised His Majesty to elect p .tir:; th T "^'^•'^•%«r'»""^ •'"- ^•'-«- ••y-hich ti. of the O'" of December, with His Maj'^'- additional Instruct" to me, which shall be punctually obeyed. , thought it v ,)p«..r " '"^ 't ^'ood on a Resolve of the Assembly. ^^ "'^-^-« with the Bill t^ could not give „,y assent, without a s^^i ^ . Had it not been for the interposition of the Magistrates, and of the most respectab[l]e Inhabitants, and of the Officers of the Army, it had become a very dangerous afl'air — as it was, only a few wounds and bruif^es were received on both sides. D^ers on tiie private husiness of each nation, timt it was not in my power earlier to transmit the proceedings which 1 now have the honour to inclose. arrived, who informed Sir William, that they had left seven canoes of Chipaweighs n' Oswego, on their way to the Congress. '" The Danl Chief of Onondagii, with the speaker of that nation, waited on Sir W" early in the morning and acquainted him, that tht ir hend warrior Diaquanda had refused to attend to business, and encamped with another Nation, which gave them al! ^s 7 ""• , "' ^'"•^ ^'^^'"'•^^ ""''' '^'■^^^Sed (as Ambassadors fron the r N i wuh Bel ts Messages and a to strengthen their alliance, and sollicit the aid of the Six N tion the I'eshaws, Wawaightonos, and other., as people troubleson.e n d Knen ^ to noh; on t e 8,x Nations would not determine, until agreable ,0 their e .ago- ""y had l,r., ,n pubhc Congress had my & concurrence thereon. As so many of the Chiefs know much of n.y sentiments concerning the K.ubassy ron, the Cher., ees i think it now more particularly necessary, to ,ddress you e thereupon In the tirst place you sh" consider, that war should never be ca ried on any Nat,on wahou, very sutlicient reasons. Sir William then spoke to the Cherokee Dep'^" and cautioned them strictly to observe the Instructions they received from their Chiefs, without addition, and alteration, as it might be of bad consequence, should they say anything to the Northern Indians beyon . All which they assured him they would strictly observe.— To this speech the Indians after some time spent in consultation answered, tliat they had heard with attantion all that Sir William had said to them ; that tht«y were very thonkful to him for the regard he had expressed for their interests — that their Chiefs would assemble early in the morning, and deliberate with as much expedition, as such a weighty allair would adi? (^.eueral tiage died in Kngland on the 2d of A.ril, 1787. and which Saweeto was determined to do on his return, but Kaghsig A^arote having lost his niece, the cou'd not then speak to him, it being contrary to their custom, but intended to do it as soon as conveniently he cou'd.

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conduct- " Sons of Liberty." ernor Moore— Agent in England, Ac 171 June 26. oirections that they should on their parts pay due regard to us. Oent emen h.m would wait with patience till monday morning when they hoped to be able to give an answer ' i- " ven to business, that the security of their Lands depended upon their despatch and e edom of the Cession -That he would however wait till Monday, when he- hoped to ., from them some thing that might make up for their delays At night several of the Cheifs came to Sir Williams Quarters to let him know the purport Intelligence and Belts received from the Shuwanese. ttl h ll I"."" n '""' ^':"'" '"' "•" '''''■'^''^'''^' -""-"'y I "t ul tlu «hole. : r 'I'-'- nolwuhstanding the steady opinion of all His M^.'. The making of them, a tender is carefully avoided ; nor can they be a Tender in any sense, by this Act, in any contract wliatsoever, the Loan Otlice and Treasury only excepted; but tlio' those Ollires are obliged to take them in, no person is obliged to receive them from either the one or the other. It is not doubted here, that these disturbances were promoted by the Enemy of Govern', in order to raise an indignation against the Assembly (then sitting) for granting money to the Soldiers, who were represented as ready to cut the throats of the Citizens. Southern Indians, until they shall propose terms of nccommodalion, and to decline their intended application for our assistance & support in the war, a circumstance which gave me much uneasiness at (irst, as 1 (ound that they came with a determined resolution to demand it in public, and that not so much from necessity as with design thereby to judge of the nature of our friendship, and the regard we piud 'to l.„ r engagements, of which they entertain great doubts; concluding upon this to be a fav.mralile occasion that must liiially determine & direct their conduct towards us, for as strict alliances with them are considered both on'ensive & defensive any evasion or refusal from us would undoubtedly in their present disposition have so far encn-ased their suspicions and resentment as to make our Trade and Frontiers feel the ellects of that spirit of War, which now predominates amongst them, at a time when we are very ill calculated to defend the one or the other, however matters may be misrepresented with regard to our strength or their weakness, (or whilst they exist in their present state, they are able to make us severely to feel their power without the possibility of their sustaining a proportionate loss even from a vigorous exertion of our abilities, so that, My Lord, disagreable as tiic alternative was on which the issue ol the proceedings lirsl appeared to depend, I found that a trilling , ircumstance when compared will, the prospect of either drawing his Maj" contrary to the principles of humanity to be an Aelor in their (piarrels, or to see at least a temporary end put to the Indian Trade, and the total ruii. Aiiotliorcirciiiiistmico much complained of as well during the Treaty, ns since by those Indian.^ \vh»accom|);tnicd mo to this place, is: of the gi.-at cargoes of Ilun-, which (of late in particular) are sent amongst tliem fo their ruin as they c ill It; many Traders carry little or notiiing i Ise, because their profits upon it arc so considerahle, and whatever resolutions they enter into, the Indians have not virtue enough to withstand the temptation when it comes amongst them. — Sir William gave them a gracious answer and assured them that he would use his influence to that end. I, after consulting the King's Ge'ne , a.d the san.e II,s Ma.,., who has through u.y representations being gracio Ly plea to nnpower me to you on this occasion, where, I am ready to hear your sentin.^. I shall speak to you upon your late treaty, which the K « has empower.! In the mean time, Sir William (notwithstanding all his end.-avours) that Liquor was brought amongst the Indians, rode round the adjacent settlements to caution the Traders, and other persons not to sell any. "' ""' '*'' ""' '"""- "' "'■' ''• ^-""'" ^ogo "f Castlebar. Wh«t the Blmwuoo h«ro uj i, partly true, th«l ii with to th« Bel U In Mii.Utter of Sir William Johnson to the Earl of Hillsborough-snrrender of the' additional' Indian ces". and we shall observe whatever you have recommended to us ^ ^g^ Brother We are sensible that we have but two great Council Fires, the one at your house, the other at Onondaga We shall a ways be ready to attend at either for the public Good, and we hope that you will continue to be ready to meet us often as the general Peace requires it A Belt LONDON DOCUMENTS : XLI. ri 117 Brother, We give you thanks for recommending unanimity to us. which was that accor Z.g to l7old agreement subsisting between the several Indian Nations, they were all to unite and attn k the . that I would a» speedily as pos Mble assemble the two 204 NEW- YORK COLONIAL MANUSCRIPTS. H..rv'm"lh,a it is against tho 206 NEW-YORK COLONIAL MANUSCRIPTS. Nor can they he a Tender of any duty, quitrent or Fine. The persons vho appear on these occasions are of inferior rank, but it is not doubted they are directed by some persons of distinction in this place. 221 the point of breaking the nonimportation agreement; I am therefore to desire that you will detain her accordingly. Since I wrote yoisr Lcir C^^ p- U, ■ l O"- of Febr'' last N" 12. of those settlements which industry and peace have added to the Colonies; this, I thouubt myself bound to prevent as well from humanity as duty, and I hope the measures I piir Mied for that purpose will be honoured with his Maj"'" approbation, as in so doing I car..|ully avoided discovering what would have been the resolutions of the Crown, and so .•oiiducted i"t as to make the issue of the Congress tlow from their own resolutions on a fartli,r and more mature consideration of the business proposed. 'I'liey therefore beg it nuiy not l)e suffered to come to their Castles or hunting places, and indeed the licentious abuse of the sale notwithstanding its peculiar profit, is extremely iiurtful to the 'I'rade in general from its effects upon the Indians, besides its giving encouragement to the nieafiest and most profligate Traders to go amongst them ; in that, neitlier capacity or knowledge of tlie Indians, or their language is necessary lor the sale of it. tiiey should come in a body, or each Nation separately ; to which Sir William answered, that, as the house in which he resided, w;is too small to admit them, lie would cauae a large arbour to be made in the Field, where he would receive them all the next n)orning. Sir William accordingly sent for Diaquanda, and after some discourse, at length persuaded him to join, and assist his Nation in Council, for which he received their sincere thiinks. n.e to iruily, and also to atten.l any other public aflairs that mav occur 1 what 1 have to o Her ,to n,e ... — In the evening, three Chiefs Deputed from the several Nations, waited on Sir William to uj)ologize lor their not returning an answer this day i'i LONDON DOCUMENTS: XLII. I have received and laid before the King your letter of the li'" of July last. 247 The great vane y of important matter proposed to be discussed in the Congress which was upon the o bemg held when you wrote that letter, necessarily creates some impatience to be mformed o the result of it, and I have reason to hope from a letter I have received frop, General Gag-,' that it will be a favourable one. but they .rtfully (Tidi giving •n uconiint of tlii \m\ bcl U reo M from the Enemy In eenrch of which the M.^s Mn Rere thon were.